Search found 4 matches

by wrt45
Sat Jun 11, 2005 9:23 am
Forum: 2005 Texas Legislative Session
Topic: Goals for 2007
Replies: 74
Views: 20398

Greybeard wrote:Glad to see suggestion of going to TP&W web site. Lots of great info. there. While there, I suggest taking a peek at accident stats and stories. Year after year, the numero uno age bracket of those involved in hunting accidents is 20 to 29 - and about 80% of 'em have never had a hunter ed. class. ("not enough time" :wink: )
Probably 75% of the adults in my HE classes over the last 5 years have been taking the class courtesy of the game warden and the JP. The other big grouping of adult students are those over the age of Texas requirements, but under the age of Colorado's cut-off (1949).

I agree mostlywith your thoughts on having enough time, but I also know for a lot of folks its not just length of time, its scheduling. I've taught several folks who were willing to make the time commitment, but couldn't do it on the schedule of their local community college instructors.

Thats the situation where the home study version is the only way to go.
by wrt45
Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:45 am
Forum: 2005 Texas Legislative Session
Topic: Goals for 2007
Replies: 74
Views: 20398

gigag04 wrote:ironic?

What purpose does a mandatory safety course serve if you can just exempt it?

I understand that you may want to "try out" hunting before getting it, but wouldn't that be MORE dangerous? An unexperienced hunter "trying it" ??

Once my AR is complete, I'll take the course just to save myself the headache when spotlighting hogs/whatever else I find. We have bad coyote probs back home...that could be fun too.
Thats what a lot of us thought when the exemption became available. However, "ours is not to reason why......."

Since time is a major factor, check out Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept. web page. Go to Hunter Education, follow the link to home study, and you will find a series of lessons with brief quizzes. When you complete the lessons on your own schedule, you print out the quizzes, take them to a home-study certified HE instructor, who in turn gives you the outdoor exercise, final exam, and live fire exercise. All in all, while it might not take much less time in total, you do it in bits and pieces at your own schedule. Plus, its only five dollars, payable when you do the test.
by wrt45
Fri Jun 10, 2005 10:29 am
Forum: 2005 Texas Legislative Session
Topic: Goals for 2007
Replies: 74
Views: 20398

Re: Young adults

[quote="tomneal"]If you are under 21,
you are not required to take the class
to hunt with another hunter.

In Texas, once you reach 17, you may not hunt, even under the supervision of another HE qualified hunter, unless you are over the grandfathered age.

There is another option, though, for the person who wants to hunt (or isn't sure) but doesn't want to take the course right now. You may purchase a one-time exemption from HE, which will be good for one hunting year. The exemption may not be repeated, but for those who aren't sure, it will give them a chance to experience hunting without the class requirement. The exemption cost is $10, and can be arranged at any license sales station.
by wrt45
Fri Jun 10, 2005 9:33 am
Forum: 2005 Texas Legislative Session
Topic: Goals for 2007
Replies: 74
Views: 20398

gigag04 wrote:What if a valid CHL met the requirement of the Hunter Safety Course?

I still havent taken the HSC.

Interesting discussion. I teach both CHL and HE, and there is no way the CHL curiculum satisfies the HE objectives. That said, I wish there were more ways to simplify the HE class for the adult that needs HE. Its very frustrating to an adult to sit in class with a bunch of 12 year olds for a couple of days.

There is an internet based HE class that eliminates much of the "sitting" time. Thats what I recommend for most adults that need the class.

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