Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

Reports of actual crimes and investigations, not hypothetical situations.

Moderators: Keith B, carlson1

Post Reply
User avatar

Topic author
carlson1
Moderator
Posts in topic: 1
Posts: 9603
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:11 am

Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

#1

Post by carlson1 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 11:34 pm

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/crime/2 ... apartments
LEWISVILLE — A man is accused of fatally stabbing and beating his 16-month-old son before a neighbor at his Lewisville apartment complex attempted to stop the attack by shooting him in the leg, police said Sunday.
Image

User avatar

Jusme
Senior Member
Posts in topic: 2
Posts: 4565
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2016 4:23 pm
Location: Johnson County, Texas

Re: Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

#2

Post by Jusme » Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:55 am

Horrible. I just hope he gets a short trial, and an even shorter rope.

Prayers sent for the family of that baby.
Take away the Second first, and the First is gone in a second :rules: :patriot:


OneGun
Senior Member
Posts in topic: 1
Posts: 588
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2014 11:22 am
Location: Houston

Re: Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

#3

Post by OneGun » Mon Aug 20, 2018 5:49 am

Good story on the use of a gun!! Very sad that a toddler was killed by his father. Prayers for the toddler's mom and family. Hope the jury gives the dad the death penalty.

Now that Hogg kid is either going to have a seizure or is going to now campaign for Knife control laws.
Annoy a Liberal, GET A JOB!

User avatar

oljames3
Senior Member
Posts in topic: 1
Posts: 2079
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2014 1:21 pm
Location: Elgin, Texas
Contact:

Re: Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

#4

Post by oljames3 » Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:23 am

When I read reports such as this, I stop and think "could I have made that shot?" I have trained to hit targets moving in a rhythmic manner, but people do not move in that way. I have trained in shooting and reloading while moving. This helps in preparing for a real-world encounter, but it is not the same. Could I shoot another person? I have already made that decision, but I was aided by SGT Jett at Fort Leonard Wood, MO, in 1973. Can I function in a loud, confusing, stressful environment? USPSA pistol matches and 34 years as a field artilleryman show that I can get acceptable hits and function under stress. SGT Jett helped with that, too. We each have to define our minimum acceptable competency level.

John Correia, of Active Self Protection, talks about "whether a firearm we carry on our person for protection is really a defensive tool, or if it’s actually a woobie."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZYQ-B2sdBU

John Daub, of KR Training, discusses minimum competency for defensive pistol.
https://blog.hsoi.com/2013/07/11/minimu ... ve-pistol/

I'm still working on my competency. I attend training several times a year. I go to the range at least once a quarter. I dry fire. I participate in USPSA matches. I may never be able to be as good as I want to be, but I will do my best to be as good as I can in using my chosen self defense tool.
O. Lee James, III Captain, US Army (Retired 2012), Honorable Order of St. Barbara
2/19FA, 1st Cavalry Division 73-78; 56FA BDE (Pershing) 78-81
NRA Distinguished Life Member (Disabled Vet), TSRA, NAR L1

User avatar

Jusme
Senior Member
Posts in topic: 2
Posts: 4565
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2016 4:23 pm
Location: Johnson County, Texas

Re: Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

#5

Post by Jusme » Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:37 am

oljames3 wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:23 am
When I read reports such as this, I stop and think "could I have made that shot?" I have trained to hit targets moving in a rhythmic manner, but people do not move in that way. I have trained in shooting and reloading while moving. This helps in preparing for a real-world encounter, but it is not the same. Could I shoot another person? I have already made that decision, but I was aided by SGT Jett at Fort Leonard Wood, MO, in 1973. Can I function in a loud, confusing, stressful environment? USPSA pistol matches and 34 years as a field artilleryman show that I can get acceptable hits and function under stress. SGT Jett helped with that, too. We each have to define our minimum acceptable competency level.

John Correia, of Active Self Protection, talks about "whether a firearm we carry on our person for protection is really a defensive tool, or if it’s actually a woobie."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZYQ-B2sdBU

John Daub, of KR Training, discusses minimum competency for defensive pistol.
https://blog.hsoi.com/2013/07/11/minimu ... ve-pistol/

I'm still working on my competency. I attend training several times a year. I go to the range at least once a quarter. I dry fire. I participate in USPSA matches. I may never be able to be as good as I want to be, but I will do my best to be as good as I can in using my chosen self defense tool.


That's probably, a question everyone asks themselves. I know as a LEO, I practiced, on several different potential scenarios, and have expanded, that since I have been a civilian, but, since we never know, when we will have to actually use those skills, or whether, our brain, and body will actually perform under stress, is something we probably won't know, beforehand.
According to the story, the shooter, fired three times, and only struck the guy once. Of course we don't know, the distance, whether, he had a clear shot, without possibly striking the child, or someone else, the angle, the type of gun, the shooter's competency, and training, or a myriad, of other things. Since as you said, most SD situations, will not involve, a person standing perfectly still, while we take careful, aim, like we would at a stationary paper target, it will all come down, to skill level, training, mental attitude, and probably a little bit of luck. JMHO
Take away the Second first, and the First is gone in a second :rules: :patriot:

User avatar

RPBrown
Senior Member
Posts in topic: 1
Posts: 4328
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 11:56 am
Location: Irving, Texas

Re: Good Guy With A Gun Stops Murderer

#6

Post by RPBrown » Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:06 am

Jusme wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:37 am
oljames3 wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:23 am
When I read reports such as this, I stop and think "could I have made that shot?" I have trained to hit targets moving in a rhythmic manner, but people do not move in that way. I have trained in shooting and reloading while moving. This helps in preparing for a real-world encounter, but it is not the same. Could I shoot another person? I have already made that decision, but I was aided by SGT Jett at Fort Leonard Wood, MO, in 1973. Can I function in a loud, confusing, stressful environment? USPSA pistol matches and 34 years as a field artilleryman show that I can get acceptable hits and function under stress. SGT Jett helped with that, too. We each have to define our minimum acceptable competency level.

John Correia, of Active Self Protection, talks about "whether a firearm we carry on our person for protection is really a defensive tool, or if it’s actually a woobie."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZYQ-B2sdBU

John Daub, of KR Training, discusses minimum competency for defensive pistol.
https://blog.hsoi.com/2013/07/11/minimu ... ve-pistol/

I'm still working on my competency. I attend training several times a year. I go to the range at least once a quarter. I dry fire. I participate in USPSA matches. I may never be able to be as good as I want to be, but I will do my best to be as good as I can in using my chosen self defense tool.


That's probably, a question everyone asks themselves. I know as a LEO, I practiced, on several different potential scenarios, and have expanded, that since I have been a civilian, but, since we never know, when we will have to actually use those skills, or whether, our brain, and body will actually perform under stress, is something we probably won't know, beforehand.
According to the story, the shooter, fired three times, and only struck the guy once. Of course we don't know, the distance, whether, he had a clear shot, without possibly striking the child, or someone else, the angle, the type of gun, the shooter's competency, and training, or a myriad, of other things. Since as you said, most SD situations, will not involve, a person standing perfectly still, while we take careful, aim, like we would at a stationary paper target, it will all come down, to skill level, training, mental attitude, and probably a little bit of luck. JMHO
Adrenaline will actually play a major roll in how you shoot as well. You often hear of LEO's in a gun fight firing several rounds only to hit the intended perpetrator once if at all. Yes, they were probably moving and yes there may be obstructions but adrenaline still plays a major roll.
I was shooting a competition many years ago and had actually made the finals. As I was getting myself ready, the start horn went off and I momentarily froze. I was not prepared for it at that moment and my adrenaline level went through the roof for a second. That was a true example to me of a "garbage run" it was so bad, even though I calmed down a few seconds later. When seconds count :shock:
NRA-Benefactor Life member
TSRA-Life member
Image

Post Reply

Return to “The Crime Blotter”