Suppresor Talk/ options

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fernando1027
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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#16

Post by fernando1027 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:27 pm

Thanks guys for the tips/ recommendations. I'll take everything in consideration once I decide what to do if to buy it or build it .
(taking a look to AndyC’s thread )


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Re: Suppresor Talk/ opcions

#17

Post by ninjabread » Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:08 pm

MechAg94 wrote:I really wish they would pass that bill to drop silencers out of the NFA
:iagree:
Imagine if there was a $200 tax on large print books. Does anybody think that would pass Constitutional muster?
This is my opinion. There are many like it, but this one is mine.



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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#18

Post by SigM4 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:27 pm

I've got a few suppressors (8) now and below are some of my thoughts.

1) Go with a reputable/big name company for your first couple cans. Nothing worse than getting a boutique anything, only to lose support shortly thereafter because the maker closed up shop. SilencerCo, Rugged, Dead Air, SureFire, YHM, Sig, etc should all be looked at, along with many that I'm missing I'm sure. Talk to other can owners (as you're doing here) and see what brands keep popping up.

2) Get a dedicated rimfire can and a .30 cal rifle can as your first two. As cool as shooting a suppressed pistol may look, it's nowhere near as rewarding as shooting a suppressed .300 BLK or a bolt action .22lr (the first time you shoot a bolt action .22 and the firing pin striking the round is louder than the round going off you'll giggle like a schoolgirl). The only place that a pistol can really shines in on an SBR'd rifle. I have an SBR'd CZ Scorpion that is a blast.

A dedicated rimfire can is a must as you'll shoot it 5x more than you'll shoot any of the others. No, I mean that. This is for several reasons:

A) Standard velocity (sub-sonic) ammo is cheap and plentiful.
B) They're relatively cheap; $300-400 gets you a great rimfire can capable of many smaller calibers (including .22lr, .22WMR, .17HMR, 5.7, etc).
C) They're great for introducing new shooters to guns because you can do so without the crack of the bullet and need for hearing protection.
D) Rimfires (especially .22lr) are inherently dirty and you'll want to be able to take apart the can to clean it. Most all rimfire cans these days are user disassembly friendly. This isn't the case with many rifle cans, though more and more are being made that you can take apart. Also, avoid aluminum rimfire cans if you can. Should you ever need to use "the dip" to remove excess leading you'll want stainless or similar. (Please read up on the dip, it's not something I recommend, but is an option if needed).
E) They're universal, almost all threaded rimfires feature 1/2x28 threads, this means you can swap guns/cans at will without needing adaptors.

As for the .30 cal rifle can, you may only have a 5.56 right now, but one of these days you might decide on a .308, or even a .300 BLK upper for your AR. The .30 cal can is more versatile all around, not only that but it will suppress your current AR better than a dedicated 5.56 can. You'll trade a little weight for this versatility, but for my $ it's worth it. Once you have a .30 cal can, if you still want to get a dedicated 5.56 can, knock yourself out, but don't limit yourself on your initial purchase.

3) Once you've knocked out a rimfire and rifle can, you may eventually want a pistol can. And why not, we all want to look like an assassin (note: the only thing I've killed recently was the remaining birthday cake from my daughter's party :angel: ). Just like the .30 cal can, you'll want to go with a .45 can for versatilities sake. Some have replaceable end caps that you can swap between 9mm and .45 caps. With any can the closer to the OD of the round your cap is the more gases the can will trap, and as a result you'll see more sound reduction, though just how much of an improvement is debatable.

So those are my thoughts, worth exactly what you paid for them, but some things I hope you'll ponder. Any way you go shooting suppressed is addictive. Once you do it you'll have a hard time going back to a public range with those heathens :mrgreen: who bang away without thinking of those around them.

Depending on where you're at I'll bet there are a couple members here that would gladly meet up with you to discuss and let you try out some cans.
Success always occurs in private, and failure in full view.


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fernando1027
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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#19

Post by fernando1027 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:44 pm

SigM4 wrote:I've got a few suppressors (8) now and below are some of my thoughts.

1) Go with a reputable/big name company for your first couple cans. Nothing worse than getting a boutique anything, only to lose support shortly thereafter because the maker closed up shop. SilencerCo, Rugged, Dead Air, SureFire, YHM, Sig, etc should all be looked at, along with many that I'm missing I'm sure. Talk to other can owners (as you're doing here) and see what brands keep popping up.

2) Get a dedicated rimfire can and a .30 cal rifle can as your first two. As cool as shooting a suppressed pistol may look, it's nowhere near as rewarding as shooting a suppressed .300 BLK or a bolt action .22lr (the first time you shoot a bolt action .22 and the firing pin striking the round is louder than the round going off you'll giggle like a schoolgirl). The only place that a pistol can really shines in on an SBR'd rifle. I have an SBR'd CZ Scorpion that is a blast.

A dedicated rimfire can is a must as you'll shoot it 5x more than you'll shoot any of the others. No, I mean that. This is for several reasons:

A) Standard velocity (sub-sonic) ammo is cheap and plentiful.
B) They're relatively cheap; $300-400 gets you a great rimfire can capable of many smaller calibers (including .22lr, .22WMR, .17HMR, 5.7, etc).
C) They're great for introducing new shooters to guns because you can do so without the crack of the bullet and need for hearing protection.
D) Rimfires (especially .22lr) are inherently dirty and you'll want to be able to take apart the can to clean it. Most all rimfire cans these days are user disassembly friendly. This isn't the case with many rifle cans, though more and more are being made that you can take apart. Also, avoid aluminum rimfire cans if you can. Should you ever need to use "the dip" to remove excess leading you'll want stainless or similar. (Please read up on the dip, it's not something I recommend, but is an option if needed).
E) They're universal, almost all threaded rimfires feature 1/2x28 threads, this means you can swap guns/cans at will without needing adaptors.

As for the .30 cal rifle can, you may only have a 5.56 right now, but one of these days you might decide on a .308, or even a .300 BLK upper for your AR. The .30 cal can is more versatile all around, not only that but it will suppress your current AR better than a dedicated 5.56 can. You'll trade a little weight for this versatility, but for my $ it's worth it. Once you have a .30 cal can, if you still want to get a dedicated 5.56 can, knock yourself out, but don't limit yourself on your initial purchase.

3) Once you've knocked out a rimfire and rifle can, you may eventually want a pistol can. And why not, we all want to look like an assassin (note: the only thing I've killed recently was the remaining birthday cake from my daughter's party :angel: ). Just like the .30 cal can, you'll want to go with a .45 can for versatilities sake. Some have replaceable end caps that you can swap between 9mm and .45 caps. With any can the closer to the OD of the round your cap is the more gases the can will trap, and as a result you'll see more sound reduction, though just how much of an improvement is debatable.

So those are my thoughts, worth exactly what you paid for them, but some things I hope you'll ponder. Any way you go shooting suppressed is addictive. Once you do it you'll have a hard time going back to a public range with those heathens :mrgreen: who bang away without thinking of those around them.

Depending on where you're at I'll bet there are a couple members here that would gladly meet up with you to discuss and let you try out some cans.



Thanks a lot for the great tips on buying it's my first one this is very hopeful ..... We be great to try some cans before I buy :tiphat:


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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#20

Post by TxD » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:10 am

Caution: Thread hijack.
For an NFA Trust. Are fingerprints required for all trusties and beneficiaries or just pictures?
TIA
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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#21

Post by superstar » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:49 am

Nice write up SigM4. Good points to consider.

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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#22

Post by Scott B. » Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:26 am

TxD wrote:Caution: Thread hijack.
For an NFA Trust. Are fingerprints required for all trusties and beneficiaries or just pictures?
TIA
For Form 1 or Form 4 items, all members of the trust have to be fingerprinted and photographed. FWIW, trusts are also taking much longer than individual applications.
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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#23

Post by SigM4 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:09 am

Scott B. wrote: FWIW, trusts are also taking much longer than individual applications.
Seeing right around 6 months right now. Not great, but a
definite improvement over just a couple years ago. It’s all relative though.
Success always occurs in private, and failure in full view.

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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#24

Post by The Annoyed Man » Wed Feb 07, 2018 12:50 pm

TxD wrote:Caution: Thread hijack.
For an NFA Trust. Are fingerprints required for all trusties and beneficiaries or just pictures?
TIA
Prints and pictures.
Give me Liberty, or I'll get up and get it myself.—Hookalakah Meshobbab
I don't carry because of the odds, I carry because of the stakes.—The Annoyed Boy


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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#25

Post by superstar » Wed Feb 07, 2018 12:55 pm

The Annoyed Man wrote:
TxD wrote:Caution: Thread hijack.
For an NFA Trust. Are fingerprints required for all trusties and beneficiaries or just pictures?
TIA
Prints and pictures.
Do you go to the sheriff's office to get the photo and fingerprint taken or does one go to the fingerprint place they went for the LTC? If it's the latter, do they give you(e-mail) you the file or do they send it when you request it? TIA.

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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#26

Post by The Annoyed Man » Wed Feb 07, 2018 1:06 pm

Scott B. wrote:
TxD wrote:Caution: Thread hijack.
For an NFA Trust. Are fingerprints required for all trusties and beneficiaries or just pictures?
TIA
For Form 1 or Form 4 items, all members of the trust have to be fingerprinted and photographed. FWIW, trusts are also taking much longer than individual applications.
Multigenerational trusts still have an advantage. When I die, my son, wife, and daughter in law will not have to surrender the NFA items on the trust because it is multigenerational. Hopefully, by the time they approach end of life, my son will be able to transfer the items to my grandson’s possession.
superstar wrote:
The Annoyed Man wrote:
TxD wrote:Caution: Thread hijack.
For an NFA Trust. Are fingerprints required for all trusties and beneficiaries or just pictures?
TIA
Prints and pictures.
Do you go to the sheriff's office to get the photo and fingerprint taken or does one go to the fingerprint place they went for the LTC? If it's the latter, do they give you(e-mail) you the file or do they send it when you request it? TIA.
We used the kiosk system provided by TheSilencershop.com at a local gunstore, but that was because I was processing a suppressor purchase through that website. Otherwise, you’d have to go get the photos taken and your prints, and send them in with your Form 4. But so far as I know, that is only required for members of a trust. I don’t know if it is required for individual buyers.
Give me Liberty, or I'll get up and get it myself.—Hookalakah Meshobbab
I don't carry because of the odds, I carry because of the stakes.—The Annoyed Boy

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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#27

Post by Scott B. » Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:52 pm

The Annoyed Man wrote: Multigenerational trusts still have an advantage. When I die, my son, wife, and daughter in law will not have to surrender the NFA items on the trust because it is multigenerational. Hopefully, by the time they approach end of life, my son will be able to transfer the items to my grandson’s possession.
Alternatively, individuals can list the NFA item(s) in their will. Then it's s Form 5 taxless transfer for the heir. It's not multi-generational, but it's easy.
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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#28

Post by The Annoyed Man » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:08 pm

Scott B. wrote:
The Annoyed Man wrote: Multigenerational trusts still have an advantage. When I die, my son, wife, and daughter in law will not have to surrender the NFA items on the trust because it is multigenerational. Hopefully, by the time they approach end of life, my son will be able to transfer the items to my grandson’s possession.
Alternatively, individuals can list the NFA item(s) in their will. Then it's s Form 5 taxless transfer for the heir. It's not multi-generational, but it's easy.
I wonder if that can be dovetailed with the trust for my heirs’ heirs.
Give me Liberty, or I'll get up and get it myself.—Hookalakah Meshobbab
I don't carry because of the odds, I carry because of the stakes.—The Annoyed Boy

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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#29

Post by SQLGeek » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:21 pm

With the changes to the way NFA items are handled, is there as much of an advantage to using an NFA trust these days if you're going to be the only one using the items in your household?
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Re: Suppresor Talk/ options

#30

Post by Scott B. » Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:03 am

If you're the only one shooting your NFA toys, I'd lean towards individual filings.

On suggestion for the heir or person handling your affairs, have example Form 5s filled out for each NFA item. Easy to do. Download the PDF, type in your details, print it off and keep it with your papers.
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