Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

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VoiceofReason
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Re: Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

#16

Post by VoiceofReason » Sat May 07, 2016 8:34 pm

Bitter Clinger wrote:
ScottDLS wrote:Isn't "derecho de piso"...the right of "floor"... Derecho de paso???? :???:
Pretty sure it's a colloquial expression used to mean something like "paying your dues". Whatever. Press "1" for English. :biggrinjester:
I am not "pretty sure" I am positive. I am not offering opinion, I am offering fact.

Izquierda (pronounced something like “eskedra”) means left and derecho means right. piso means floor

Rangel was my wife's maiden name 48 years ago. We are still married and still love each other.
God Bless America, and please hurry.
When I was young I knew all the answers. When I got older I started to realize I just hadn’t quite understood the questions.-Me

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ScottDLS
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Re: Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

#17

Post by ScottDLS » Sat May 07, 2016 11:20 pm

VoiceofReason wrote:
Bitter Clinger wrote:
ScottDLS wrote:Isn't "derecho de piso"...the right of "floor"... Derecho de paso???? :???:
Pretty sure it's a colloquial expression used to mean something like "paying your dues". Whatever. Press "1" for English. :biggrinjester:
I am not "pretty sure" I am positive. I am not offering opinion, I am offering fact.

Izquierda (pronounced something like “eskedra”) means left and derecho means right. piso means floor

Rangel was my wife's maiden name 48 years ago. We are still married and still love each other.
Was thinking the phrase might be "Derecho de paso". Derecha means "right" in the sense of left or right, and derecho means right as in civil right in the Spanish speaking places I've been. And piso means floor. Que piso? "What floor?" is what they always asked me in the elevator in South America. Derecho de paso...seems to translate as "right of passage" which makes more sense in cartel context... :???:
4/13/1996 Completed CHL Class, 4/16/1996 Fingerprints, Affidavits, and Application Mailed, 10/4/1996 Received CHL, renewed 1998, 2002, 2006, 2011, 2016...). "ATF... Uhhh...heh...heh....Alcohol, tobacco, and GUNS!! Cool!!!!"


WTR
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Re: Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

#18

Post by WTR » Sun May 08, 2016 12:02 am

ScottDLS wrote:
VoiceofReason wrote:
Bitter Clinger wrote:
ScottDLS wrote:Isn't "derecho de piso"...the right of "floor"... Derecho de paso???? :???:
Pretty sure it's a colloquial expression used to mean something like "paying your dues". Whatever. Press "1" for English. :biggrinjester:
I am not "pretty sure" I am positive. I am not offering opinion, I am offering fact.

Izquierda (pronounced something like “eskedra”) means left and derecho means right. piso means floor

Rangel was my wife's maiden name 48 years ago. We are still married and still love each other.
Was thinking the phrase might be "Derecho de paso". Derecha means "right" in the sense of left or right, and derecho means right as in civil right in the Spanish speaking places I've been. And piso means floor. Que piso? "What floor?" is what they always asked me in the elevator in South America. Derecho de paso...seems to translate as "right of passage" which makes more sense in cartel context... :???:
It is derecho de piso. Trust me......Spanish sayings do not always make literal scene when translated to English.

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VoiceofReason
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Re: Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

#19

Post by VoiceofReason » Sun May 08, 2016 8:49 am

WTR wrote:
ScottDLS wrote:
VoiceofReason wrote:
Bitter Clinger wrote:
ScottDLS wrote:Isn't "derecho de piso"...the right of "floor"... Derecho de paso???? :???:
Pretty sure it's a colloquial expression used to mean something like "paying your dues". Whatever. Press "1" for English. :biggrinjester:
I am not "pretty sure" I am positive. I am not offering opinion, I am offering fact.

Izquierda (pronounced something like “eskedra”) means left and derecho means right. piso means floor

Rangel was my wife's maiden name 48 years ago. We are still married and still love each other.
Was thinking the phrase might be "Derecho de paso". Derecha means "right" in the sense of left or right, and derecho means right as in civil right in the Spanish speaking places I've been. And piso means floor. Que piso? "What floor?" is what they always asked me in the elevator in South America. Derecho de paso...seems to translate as "right of passage" which makes more sense in cartel context... :???:
It is derecho de piso. Trust me......Spanish sayings do not always make literal scene when translated to English.
Que pasa” means "what's happening" and "Que piso" means "what floor" a slight change in the way a word is pronounced can have a whole different meaning. I became very familiar with “left” and “right” working with a mostly “Chicano” crew setting up telephone poles when I worked with the telephone company.

Believe what you want though as I am no longer going to argue the point.
God Bless America, and please hurry.
When I was young I knew all the answers. When I got older I started to realize I just hadn’t quite understood the questions.-Me

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ScottDLS
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Re: Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

#20

Post by ScottDLS » Sun May 08, 2016 9:08 am

I did some research and it seems that the phrase means something roughly like 'being given permission by the group...or being accepted or given leave to act'.... At least that's what some Spanish web sites suggested, given my limited understanding. It definitely doesn't translate literally.
4/13/1996 Completed CHL Class, 4/16/1996 Fingerprints, Affidavits, and Application Mailed, 10/4/1996 Received CHL, renewed 1998, 2002, 2006, 2011, 2016...). "ATF... Uhhh...heh...heh....Alcohol, tobacco, and GUNS!! Cool!!!!"

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Re: Report: Mexican Cartels Helping Jihadists Infiltrate US

#21

Post by LosAlce » Sun May 08, 2016 9:47 am

Really amused how this thread got sidetracked into a disagreement about spanish wording.
WTR wrote: It is derecho de piso. Trust me......Spanish sayings do not always make literal scene when translated to English.
I'm the daughter of spanish speaking immigrants but I am not Mexican. Spanish is as diverse and confusing as English can be. WTR is right in saying literal translations don't always make sense and it can be made even more complicated depending on the speaker's country of origin.

Derecho de piso would make more sense in the context of having to earn their way there or earn the right to be there, like climbing the corporate ladder or paying one's dues at work. (like Bitter Clinger mentioned before)

Derecho de paso would make more sense in the context of a right of way, or to cross like at a crosswalk. (as mentioned by ScottDLS)

I could tell you: "Que ladilla, este foro me tiene arrecha porque tengo a brinca de un respuesta a otro para comunicarse claramente" and that could mean something very different to one spanish speaker to another, depending on where they are from. (specifically a Venezuelan or a Colombian)

Honestly, I think both can be used because the point can still be made. There's more than one way to skin a cat. Seeing as how I am not Mexican though (and that does matter at this moment) I can't be certain. Just offering my $0.02 and wanted to stress the fact that there is no set "spanish" just like there is no single version of "english". Some things get lost in translation but eventually, we'll all get the meaning.

Carry on, mi amigos. No te preocupa de los cosas pequeño :thumbs2:
LTC since: 4/26/2016
Carrying: Sig P938 :rock"

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